Truth

posted May 9th, 2013, 2:01 am


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March 29th, 2013, 6:39 pm

GreenKrog

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Toni's girl aura is blue!

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view CuteDress&TwinPonytails's profile

May 9th, 2013, 5:10 am

CuteDress&TwinPonytails

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Shouldn't Toni's girl aura be pink, or lavender, or some other pastel girl's colour ? Blue is for boys, according to the saying,
" Pink is for Girls,
Blue is for Boys " .

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May 9th, 2013, 11:53 am

GreenKrog

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@CuteDress&TwinPonytails: Pink was considered a manly colour until the 20s. I wouldn't consider it static!

Aside from that, why attach to convention? Why be a slave to what society things is necessary or 'normal'? The entire path of being trans* is becoming *yourself*, not who you think others want you to be. How you feel inside often isn't how you show on the outside. One of my goth friends dresses in very dark clothing, par for the course for goth, but he is one of the nicest guys, and will always be there to help you feel lighter.

Besides all of that, if I imagine myself on paper, my aura is green. Specifically, the colour you get when you burn a hose - a green flame.
(Authors note - don't be stupid and burn a hose. It releases a lot of chems that can do really bad stuff to your lungs and eyes. We did it in science class to see some cool flame colours).

What colour is YOUR aura, if you imagine yourself in Toni's situation? What colour is your peaceful eternal landscape?
There is no wrong answer! And if you say pink, because that's what best represents YOU, then that is just fine. You don't answer to anyone but yourself.

---

Edit;
This got me thinking. What are the auras of the other people in Toni's world? She isn't psychic, so its not like she can see them. Here's how I see it.

Ron - Like watching fire roll along a ceiling, but with primary green and highlights of pink.

Mitch - I have no idea. Even the RMitch, he is imperceptible. What do you folks think?

Lexi - Red. Not anger, but passion. Like her bathing suit when they first met. When enthralled in something, her aura goes from red to a white/red nova.

Sophie - An impure silver bar that accidently got blood mixed into it while it was cooling. A fuzzy silver with a red hue. Like a hunter's moon.
I'd really like to be able to picture he as pure sure, without the fuzz, but I don't think she is there yet.

Bill - Blue. A faded blue. Not like Toni's, more like jeans that got worn for too long.

Julie - Faded gold. The soul of a person who cannot be tarnished, but carries the tiny pits and scrapes of someone who has heard the pain of hundreds.

Dan - Also blue, but darker than Bill's. Rolls of deep blue close to the body, like tiny arcs of a tesla coil.

Andrea (who you haven't met yet, but is my favourite character!) - white. Pure, clean, eternal, white. Other times black, cracked and sharded and spiderwebbed with white.

Jamie (who you havent met yet) - black, but, a good black. Like shade in a park, only much blacker.

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May 9th, 2013, 8:07 pm

Thompson.af

Blue is very feminine

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@GreenKrog: I associated blue with women for a long time.. mostly due to the Mary figure during Christmas..
That light blue outfit she always wore to signify purity and femininity.. I dunno.. I thought it was a powerful colour for women

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May 10th, 2013, 12:35 pm

CuteDress&TwinPonytails

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You have touched on a concept that is much larger than what colour a girl should wear, or have as an aura, AnnaKrog. I will try and briefly explain the concept, and give an illustration of how the principal applies.

The concept is whether or not a transgender person should or should not adhere to the Gender Binary.
( Gender Binary = The dictates of society in general as to what constitutes 'masculine' looks and behaviour, and what constitutes 'feminine' looks and behaviour, and what looks or behaviour lie outside of the perceived norm that society has established for the two genders. )
Transgender people have a choice of whether or not to conform to the Gender Binary, or to go off and do whatever their heart tells them to do, with little regard to the Gender Binary, or what society thinks of them. This choice can be very controversial, because either you conform, or do not conform, or are somewhere inbetween.

Here's an illustration to show the point of the Gender Binary. Two individuals are both male-to-female transgender adults, myself, Ponytails, and the other person, Jo. For myself, I choose to " buy into " the Gender Binary, and conform my dress, grooming, and mannerisms to what is expected of an adult female in English-speaking society. So to go to the shopping mall, I choose to dress as what is expected of an adult female. I dress in a pretty white, pink, and green flower print, short sleeve, above-the-knee hemline pleated dress, beige coloured pantyhose, and black mary-jane pumps. My hair is styled in pigtails, or twin ponytails with cute pink ribbons in my hair. I have no trouble at the mall, in fact, I talk briefly with the mall security guard, who sees me as an adult female, and wishes me well.

Jo, on the other hand, DOES NOT " buy into " the " Gender Binary ". She feels that one should dress and act however one feels at one's heart, with little or no regard to what society thinks. So Jo dresses to go to the mall in a clown's outfit, done in various shades of blue, with baggy pants, oversized shoes, a rainbow coloured wig, and all of the other mis-matched accessories that one sees a clown wear. " Blue is the colour of girls ", she says. She feels happy at heart, so she dresses to feel happy, like a clown, with no concern for what other people think or feel. Well, within a half hour, Jo is confronted by the mall security police, wanting to know why she is dressed as a clown. See explains that she rejects the Gender Binary, and will dress and act as she pleases, regardless of how anyone feels. Needless to say, Jo is taken to the police station for questioning, on the charge of " disturbing the peace ".

So how important is it to conform, or reject, the Gender Binary ? As the saying goes, " Pink is for Girls, Blue is for Boys ". How important is it for everyone to decide what to do about the colors, and style of dress that you wear, the conduct and mannerisms you display out in public, or the aura
that you give off ? Did you notice in the illustration that I did conform, in most respects, to the Gender Binary ? However, I was a little non-conformist in that my hair style of pigtails is normally only worn by little girls. Mary-Jane shoes are also normally worn only by little girls. So I did " bend " the Gender Binary a little, so as to look " cute " for an adult, but not to the extent that Jo did, completely disregarding it in favor of what she wanted to do.
Each transgender person must decide for themselves about the Gender Binary, and be able to accept and deal with the consequences.
I, myself, Ponytails, have chosen to conform to the Gender Binary as it relates to an adult female. How about you ?

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May 10th, 2013, 2:05 pm

GreenKrog

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@CuteDress&TwinPonytails: I was discussing it yesterday with RRon (the real Ron, the person I loosely base Ron off of).

Remember when Tony took Sophie on that date? And she didn't get why she had to wear a skirt? She never wears one, and it was out of character for her to do so. According to the binary logic, women would be wearing skirts/dresses all the time. And yet, many wear these items seldomly. Pants are just the mainstay for the majority of people in North America.
Go into any populated area and just people watch for a while. Unless it is particularly nice out, this should become apparent quickly.
Given how Sophie wears a sports jersey and pants all the time, and doesn't trim her eyebrows or paint her nails, do you think of her as any less feminine? Would it make her any more or less of a girl to express in a more 'female appropriate manner'?

I usually dress in button-up shirts with short sleeves, jeans, and arm warmers to cover my scars. My hair is above shoulder length and purple, generally worn in a single ponytail. I almost never wear lipstick (though lately Ive been feeling goth, so I've been wearing deep red), and I *never* wear anything on my eyes. My nails, if they are painted, are painted poorly, and either black or red.
This all said, my ex wears above-shoulder hair, black or white tank top, and jeans. She will never wear a skirt at all, because she identifies as butch. Never wears any makeup of accessories that aren't leather or chain. And yet, nobody ever questions who or what she is.

Being a clown doesn't factor into gender binary, its a facetious argument at best. Garishness that flies into any part of the spectrum tends to be. That said, as a semi-goth, I understand that fully. (This actually gets covered much more when Andrea shows up).

To wear clown gear, or other 'uniform' or 'costume' gear, and to compare it to a trans* person trying to emulate their internal gender, is, at least to me, hurtful. Many trans* people are told they are just wearing a costume, they aren't actually a girl or boy and never can be.

At least, that's my take on it. Everyone can, and *should* dress exactly how they want to (within law), with no shame or fear, and should be happy and joyful in life.

And Toni's aura should be whatever colour she feels is hers.

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May 10th, 2013, 10:54 pm

CuteDress&TwinPonytails

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I think that you misunderstood my illustration, AnnaKrog. It was not meant to refer to transgender people and what they choose to wear. That decision was left open-ended in my line of reasoning, for the reader to decide. Taking it as you described would indeed be hurtful, and to apply it that way, but that was not the point or application of it. It was meant to draw a contrast between conforming and non-conforming in a hypothetical way. I'm sorry if the illustration was taken the wrong way, from Ponytails.

You are certainly entitled to wear what you want to, be it inside or outside of the Gender Binary. I choose inside, on the cute side.

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May 10th, 2013, 11:33 pm

GreenKrog

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@CuteDress&TwinPonytails: You will never have to apologize to me, Ponytails.

No conversation between two or more rational, thought out people, expressing detailed opinions, is a waste. Even if they cannot arrive at the same conclusion, simply discussing it can provoke deeper thought and meaning.
Had you not called me on the colour of the aura, I wouldn't have considered everyone elses. Had you not expressed the metaphor above, we wouldn't have provided more examples of non-conformative gender expression to trans* people who have yet to find their own way.

Aside from these reasons, a friend never needs to apologize to another friend. So you will never, ever need to apologize to me.

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May 11th, 2013, 3:09 pm

Elessir

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I'm actually waging a pretty intense internal war about what sort of clothes and jewelry I -want- to wear vs what society says I should. I believe that gender identities are obsolete, and people should be able to wear what they want, but it has been incredibly hard to break out of that shell myself. Following your comic, Krog, is helping a lot.

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June 12th, 2014, 3:13 am

mittfh

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Auras: One point not yet made is that drawing a pink aura could be perceived as insufficiently distinguishable from the red aura of anger. Blue, on the other hand, carries connotations of calmness / peace.

On the clothing front, while in an ideal society, anyone could wear any 'street' clothes from either side of the stereotype and not be called out for it, in reality Western society still carries vestiges of the patriarchal past, so females wearing stereotypically male clothing won't generally be noticed or called out for their choice; whereas conversely, males wearing stereotypically female clothing...

What does seem to be an increasing (unfortunate?) trend is the tendency to dress infants in gendered clothing asap - especially miniature versions of adult clothing - even before the infant is independently mobile.

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