Better Party

posted April 21st, 2014, 2:01 am


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view GreenKrog's profile

August 24th, 2013, 2:24 am

GreenKrog

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The title might be confusing. It is supposed to be in relation to the party that usually goes on Friday nights after practice/meets. Which Annie isn't at. Because she is with her friends.

Also, when (fuck, do I really have to explain this?) P calls Lexi a dyke, it is an affectionate term. In Vancouver, there is an annual Dyke March, where lesbians from all over the lower mainland gather and march up Commercial Drive. So yeah, we call ourselves dykes. Here in Vancouver, we reclaimed it.
So NO, it is NOT being used offensively.
You people on that forum can eat me. Seriously.

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view stickygirl's profile

April 21st, 2014, 2:05 pm

stickygirl

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Is it all ok with that march now? I heard there was some problem with trans* and the organisers a couple of years back.
These are friends hanging out so, not offensive - affectionate :)

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April 21st, 2014, 2:44 pm

GreenKrog

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@stickygirl: Yeah, the march and the pride parade got their act together and are now properly trans inclusive. There were some HUGE problems a few years ago, basically, transwomen (read: transmen were always cool) were being either ignored or deliberately pushed out of planning and recognition.

I've always sort of wondering about the reclamation of words between friends. Like, myself and a coworkers sometimes call each other tranny, but hey, we are both cool with it. And RThompkins sometimes calls me one and I call him a fag, but we also both know we would die to protect the other. Then again, RMitch calls RThompkins a fag too, and he is straight, and never calls me anything, and we all know RMitch would beat down anyone for bigotry any day. So where do we draw the lines? None of us would ever call someone we don't know by these things, but to us, they are just words. Funny words that poke fun at other people using them as insults. Like how we call each other "whitey", because it doesn't MEAN anything. And yet, you would never refer to anyone else that way, right?

Food for thought, I guess.

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April 21st, 2014, 5:19 pm

stickygirl

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Ironical language is intended to be inclusive by parodying the insult, if that makes sense. You have to have a mutual understanding with someone before you can mock-insult them or else the mocking can be misinterpreted. Used correctly it bonds people more strongly, because it acknowledges a shared understanding of the slur. Out of context and the insult remains - like the way the word gay has been hijacked and gets used as a negative by the hetero community. I suppose it's because words like that are so blatant.

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