Identification

posted September 6th, 2014, 2:01 am


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October 26th, 2013, 4:39 am

GreenKrog

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Lets have a little dip into my memories, shall we? It was actually stirred up this week by Reddit, where someone was asking if a trans*person can donate blood in Canada.
Now, I don't know the rules behind it, and I don't care any more. Because;

I was a huge advocate of giving blood. As soon as I was of legal age to do so (high school some time) I started giving blood every time they would let me. We don't get paid for it in Canada, mind you, I just wanted to save people's lives. I convinced my friends to come with me. In fact, we made a big deal of it because everyone went on our early Wednesdays off and had fun and did a good thing!
I went to college. I didn't have transportation and was too poor to use transit, so I didn't donate blood. Of course, during this time, I also came to the realization that I could no longer deny being trans*. I quit college, and came back to Calgary.

Now that I was back in town, had a good job, and my friends, I decided, hey, damn right I'm going to give blood again! So a short time after getting my name legally changed, *on my birthday*, we went to donate blood. The nurse volunteer people asked me if I had donated under another name before. Being the honest person I am, I said yes. So they then started to explain that since I had not yet received my paperwork back, they legally had to call me my old name. That I needed an amended birth certificate anyways, not just a legal change of name.
Skip forward half an hour, I am downstairs, outside, crying my hormonal ass off and unable to cope with what just happened. The head person in charge came down and told me that the people who had done that to me were very wrong and I could donate blood no problem. I could barely remember what was happening. I think I left without my friends. I was pretty dizzy for a while.
I've never donated blood again.

Now, this may be a bad story, I wanted to point out how people in authority can choose to abuse what they claim as legal right.
However, every birthday since then, I have asked everyone who cares about me to go and donate blood. My depressed worthless body can't do it, but at least my continued existence can yield some good.
So hey. Next August? Go donate for me. Maybe you can save someone's life.
I bet that would feel good.

(Follow up from 2014;
I went to donate blood this summer. I figured in 10 years they might have changed their ways of dealing with us. I have had surgery, I am beautiful, for all intents, I couldn't be more of a woman.
They told me since I am trans, I don't qualify to donate blood. Despite meeting every critera as both male and female, having no risks, and no possible reason to be denied, they denied me.
A week later a head nurse called and said I now qualify as a woman and I am allowed to donate.
Fuck them.)

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September 6th, 2014, 6:05 am

Noodlez

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*hugs*

I've had a bad experience with blood services canada as well. The first time I donated I had a false positive. At the time you weren't allowed to ever donate again. I was heartbroken. All I wanted to do was help, however I couldn't anymore.

Apparently now I can, but now I am trans, sooo dunno if I'll ever go back.

Also one thing I want to point out about the comic which has me confused, Annie is only 14. She has no guardian or adult with her for the interrogation, how is that legal? (BTW looked it up, it's not legal in this case: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/Y-1.5/page-57.html#h-49 )

Annie has been told that she was facing charges of public endangerment, so now it's not voluntary statement anymore, it is an interrogation into whether the charge of public endangerment can proceed. At which point she should have been told she is allowed an adult to be there, or that she has to state she is waiving her right to counsel or an adult.

I know, I'm just being super picky, and this is a comic, but no matter what evidence they gather from this interrogation, it is no longer admissible evidence.

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September 6th, 2014, 3:30 pm

GreenKrog

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@Noodlez: Annie is 15. Like I said in the thingy before this thingy, I wasn't at all sure of the legality of talking to a minor without a guardian. It wasn't an interrogation because the charges were not yet pressed - she was there voluntarily. At no point did they say that she was being pressed - I made that quite clear by how the officers were just talking. In the link you provided, she is complying with 146.2.a.

This is not a demand for information, they did not even need her to be there - in the comic requesting 'Tony' to come, it was phrased as a request and not a demand. I know, it is semantics, but like you said, we are both super picky. Which is why I did it, because I was sure that someone would point out the flaws!
Though if you are going to come back with 'the officer didn't read her any rights', then I am just going to have to say that I only get 6 frames per comic and I am going to be text bombing to hell relatively soon as it is.

@Kit: Annie is 15, her birthday was near the start of August. It was brought up right after the comic started (Tony got told he was moving, then the next frame was his brother helping him move, with the title Age:15). Then when she was scared to go to the hospital again during the winter after being assaulted, she ran to the hill (Prairie Winds, for those from Calgary). In it, she asked Sophie why this was happening, as she was only 15.
The age was chosen specifically because she was not yet going through the rough part of puberty, and had not yet had the male growth spurt that would make him taller than the girls, who usually grow taller at a younger age then men.

@CuteDress&TwinPonytails: As written by Noodlez, not exactly. In Canada the criminal code is a little different than the states - prisoner rights are actually a lot more important here.
Try not to die any time soon, lots of states are changing their birth certificate laws. Canada is nearing the mark of not needing surgery for the right info, and I think a few states have already started to make more progressive change.

@Katla: I hear you. When I went most recently, the phone operator and the front desk and everyone was like, NO WALKINS. I was there and there was a single person ahead of me, and nobody behind me. It was a ghost town. On a Saturday in the afternoon. Like, if they want our blood,who the fuck is going to take off a work day? Be open on a Saturday, allow walk-ins, and get all the blood you want! The people I hang out with (except for those of us with acidic tranny blood, that is) would randomly say 'fuck it' and go donate just as a way to spend the afternoon. CBS really needs to get their priorities in order.

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September 6th, 2014, 8:16 am

Kit (Guest)

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Wait, Annie's 14? I thought she was 16 or 17 or so.

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September 6th, 2014, 9:06 am

CuteDress&TwinPonytails

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Annie is now 15, if I remember correctly. Correct me if I'm wrong, but in some circumstances, under Canadian law, she can be considered a Mature Minor, and now has some adult rights granted to her.

BTW---I was born in Ohio. Transgender people who where born in Ohio, Tennessee, or Idaho will forever have to have dual identity, because these backward states do not allow one's birth certificate to be changed, corrected, or amended, as in never, Never, and NEVER ! So public officials ( or anybody, really ) can always harass them by referring back to the gender marker on the birth certificate, and publicly calling the transgender person out, and by using their discarded birth gender to " out " them in the most cruel and embarrassing fashion. This plague will follow me for the rest of my life, until I die. Even at my funeral, I could be dressed and buried as my wrongly perceived birth gender, not my correct gender of an adult female.

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September 6th, 2014, 10:15 am

Katla (Guest)

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I used to give blood every two months when it was still the canadian red cross maintaining the system. Their building here in Winnipeg wasn't the greatest, but it was easy to get to, and they were always open. Then, they had that scandal and canadian blood services was created to take over, and the address changed, there was only one bus going past it, so I needed to transfer twice each way to get there, and they were only open for 3 hours every wednesday, which I could never make it there for. I kept trying to give blood, though, and managed to maybe 3 times in the next two years, before I said 'yeah, fuck you, you make it way too hard to give you my precious O- blood that you claim you need so much, so I won't be back.' And I haven't been.

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September 6th, 2014, 5:02 pm

Noodlez

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@GreenKrog Sorry about my comment, I was in a pissy mood this morning. I interpreted the previous page as if the officer said that they are investigating the issue in order to know whether to press charges.

Either way, I knew full well that this is fiction and I wouldn't expect you to do 6 frames of her rights being said to her XD

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September 6th, 2014, 6:03 pm

GreenKrog

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@Noodlez: I can totally get why you would think that. I don't know if it is in the police that decide to press charges or not, in fairly certain though that it is the choice if the offended party. The police probably can provide council, along the lines of 'having heard both sides, we would advise letting it go' or something. I don't know!

Don't worry about coming off snarky, it's all good. Especially when we are arguing legalities, how can we not get bogged down in technicality! :)

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