Trigger Warning

posted September 3rd, 2012, 8:40 pm


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December 25th, 2013, 8:47 pm

GreenKrog

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I really do mean it, every word. Wildflowers doesn't hold back anything in the experiences of the main character, and those in the world around her. Many of these experiences are based off of my own life, and the lives of trans*people I have known or lost.

There are many, much happier, much better drawn, more spirited webcomics and mangas that delve into gender dysphoria without the horrible nature of Wildflowers. I have linked some in the 'other stuff I read' area above. I also know others that have completed and are worth reading and are not listed above.

If you do decide to read, or stop here but still come to a bad place in your life, I really do mean it that I will be here. Any time of day, every day, if I get a message or a comment post, it is my only priority to make sure that whoever's lives I touch are sustained and can continue on. I've been in the dark places. I know how it feels. And I won't judge you, no matter how much you might judge yourself.

You are worth so much more than you will ever know. I hope that you can see that, if not now, than some day soon.
You are loved.

-The AnneKrog

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August 28th, 2014, 2:57 pm

Stephanie (Guest)

Your comic feels very real

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Thank you so much for making it. Although everyones path is different, they're similar enough that it rings very true. Although I'm still in transition, it awoke feelings I thought were long gone, and reminded me of the pain I'd experienced growing up before I knew myself well enough to know I was transgender. Very well done. :D

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August 28th, 2014, 7:55 pm

GreenKrog

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@Stephanie: Thank you for your kind words, and for joining us all on Tony/Annie's journey. I deeply treasure every person who comes along the ride.

I do hope that the memories that WF sparks are not bad for you. This webcomic clearly deals with some very unhappy things, and I would hate to think that it causes you pain. On the other hand, if it reminds you of how far you've come and how amazing you are now? That I can be ok with.

It does seem that a lot of trans people didn't really piece together the 'oh, I'm trans. Derp' until either something catalyzed their life or until they finally figured it out. There is so much focus in the media on those four year olds who knew from the day they were born. So many therapists who won't accept 'I didn't make sense of it until I was 20'. Yet, the more people who write in, the more I find that Annie's story really isn't that far off.

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September 9th, 2014, 8:00 am

Stephanie (Guest)

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I 'knew' I was different from at least 5, but didn't have the words for it. I knew I was physically a boy, but never felt right in that body.

I was dressing at 12, but got caught and the shame of that drove everything deep underground for ages. I did a lot of typical compensating behaviors to try to be more 'manly'. I worked construction, joined the Navy and served in submarines, did manly stuff like hunting and whatnot. I always felt like a fraud though.

It wasn't until I was much older that I began to unwind who I was and why I felt so disconnected as a person who was supposed to be male. I've been on HRT for nearly 3 years and am finally becoming who I've needed to be. Yay me! :D

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April 26th, 2015, 7:17 am

Sonya Rae (Guest)

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@Stephanie: Your story really struck a chord with me. I 'knew' some things too from before the age of 5, without having the words or understanding to explain them. I felt happy and comfortable playing with girls, but not so much with boys, and there was something about girls that I deeply wanted to be. I accepted that I was a 'boy', forlornly, as a matter of fact, in the same way one might accept that one has a physical handicap. Like you, I never felt quite right in a boy's body, and detested the genitalia, though at that time I didn't even understand that there was an anatomical difference there.

I didn't really 'dress', except for a sheet and a belt that left no evidence, and managed never to be caught and shamed. But the shame was present anyway, and like you, I generally tried to do manly compensating activities in hopes that that would make me respectably male. Some of it was real, some fraudulent, but mostly it was self-training for being the manly person I felt obliged to become.

Congratulations on figuring out who you really are. I wish you the best of luck with your transition!

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