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posted June 30th, 2016, 2:01 am


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September 15th, 2015, 6:29 pm

GreenKrog

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Is Julie reading Annie's mind? Why else would she mention Andrea? Maybe Annie is just THAT obvious? Shrinks are so hard to scrutinize because they scrute you in the ize back.

What do you little monsters think? Is Annie making the right choice by saying Julie shouldn't be involved? Moreso, is Julie making the right choice to let this happen? To not act on a minor hurting themselves is against their code, I think. But does Julie honestly believe that it is better to wait until Kora (Grace) is ready to get help, instead of trying to force it?

I don't like this choice. There isn't a good way to make it. Why does it have to be made.

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June 30th, 2016, 3:35 am

Carbisari (Guest)

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If going to in/out patient taught me anything, it's hard to help someone until they start looking/asking for it. The therapists I dealt with would mention that you kinda have to just wait until they get fed up, and then seek help.

It's hard to get substantial improvement out of someone unless they're willing to put that extra step in.

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June 30th, 2016, 4:07 am

Yan Mouson

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@GreenKrog: I'd say that telling Julie was ultimately the right choice, even if it was less a choice and more an accident. Fact is, Annie is not qualified to know what the best thing to do is in this situation. Julie is, because that's her job, and Annie knows that Julie is trustworthy. Whether or not Julie decides to intervene, telling her was the right thing to do.

You may argue that in doing so, Annie is breaking Kora's trust, but the fact is, sometimes you need to do that. The current situation is unsustainable: Kora can't just keep cutting indefinitely with no one aware of it. There has to be a responsible adult, trained to handle this, ready to step in if things get out of hand, otherwise Annie might end up looking at a dead Kora and thinking that maybe her trust doesn't matter all that much after all.

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June 30th, 2016, 7:33 am

Anna (Guest)

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There's also the question of patient confidentiality. Annie has made it clear she doesn't think Kora is in immediate mortal danger. Julie intervening without Annie's permission could be a breach of professional ethics because it reveals information about what happened in therapy sessions with Annie. Of course, it also depends on what sorts of things Julie is a Mandated Reporter for (e.g. child abuse in earlier chapters). And given there's no whistle-blowing on Annie's primary caregiver also being her therapist, this is already very different from the rules I'm familiar with...

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June 30th, 2016, 11:51 am

GreenKrog

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@Anna: technically Dr Bernt has legal powers with Annie but isn't her caregiver, that would be Annie's parents only. That Annie stays over with her friend Lexi all the time and that just happens to be where Dr Bernt lives? That's a bit of a grey area.
For what it is worth, they does come up later and it sucks for Annie as much as you would expect a conflict of interest of this magnitude to suck.

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