Cornered

posted October 25th, 2016, 2:01 am


average rating: None
post a comment
user comments
view CuteDress&TwinPonytails's profile

October 25th, 2016, 11:01 am

CuteDress&TwinPonytails

reply

Panel 6---I can't hardly believe that if that is Principal Harper speaking, that he has had such a change of heart . . . .

end of message
view GreenKrog's profile

October 25th, 2016, 11:23 am

GreenKrog

reply

@CuteDress&TwinPonytails: Harper wears a dark blue shirt. This is the math teacher (who doesn't have a name).

end of message

October 25th, 2016, 4:34 pm

mittfh

reply

@GreenKrog: Which indicates that despite his praise for Annie, as of now (i.e. pages to be published Sep/Oct 2017) he still hasn't been significant enough in her life to warrant you naming him.

Poor nameless character :( :D

end of message
view GreenKrog's profile

October 25th, 2016, 9:20 pm

GreenKrog

reply

@mittfh: Olsen didn't have a name for several years of writing. I would say he was significant?

Edit: One of the most important interactions I have had in my life was with a total stranger. I was in the midst of depression, as usual, but I just finished a long bike ride - like, 30 miles. So I was on a bit of a physical high. I was sitting in McDonalds eating my salad and this guy walked over to me and said one thing: Never lose that smile.
For the first time in weeks I was smiling, when everything in my life was hard to do. And yet, this total stranger said this thing that got me through a few months of my own internal pain.
People don't need names to be significant. It is their actions that matter.

end of message

November 3rd, 2016, 8:51 pm

Lex-Kat (Guest)

reply

"I was sitting in McDonalds eating my salad and this guy walked over to me and said one thing: 'Never lose that smile'."

@GreenKrog: That was beautiful.

There have been a few times in my life that are similar. I work for the USPS, and have to occasionally deal with customers.

Once, when I was the one greeting customers, I let a driver in. Now, I don't think I pass... at all. But this man greeted me immediately with 'Thank you, ma'am.' when I opened the door for him. It was the most beautiful thing I had heard. He was polite and treated me like I would hope he'd treat any other lady. And there was no sense of false in his voice.

It made me feel wonderful for weeks, and still gives me a smile and a tear to this day.

end of message

June 13th, 2017, 1:47 am

sunspark

reply

Christmas 1997 I ended up telling my brothers and father in Naples, FL about my impending transition. I had not intended to; it just sort of...happened. I was GOING to tell them after telling my mom, who lived in NH, on a visit in early Feb. So anyway all I asked of them was to let me tell everyone else.

I got a call a few days later from my mom. My father had flown up to her house to tell her. Because he was that kind of complete asshat. So I quickly revised my plans and flew to NH two weeks earlier than planned. My mom and sister agreed to go shopping with me--as me--while I was there, and that would be the first time I was ever out as myself.

But something happened on the way that I'll never forget. I went to the airport dressed pretty normally: sweatshirt, jeans. Hungry, I stopped at a food court for a quick slice of pizza. The clerk said, "Anything else with that, Ma'am?"

It threw me for a loop. I had never been "ma'amed" before. I quickly said no, paid, and left, hoping no one else who could see me had heard.

An hour later, on the plane, I was seated next to this businessman who was already busy reading a magazine when the flight attendant came around to ask about drinks. I had headphones on, so even though I was in the aisle seat she asked him first. Then she looked at me (I'd taken them off by then) and asked, "And for you, Ma'am?"

"Diet Coke," I answered, wondering what the hell was going on. Sweatshirt and jeans, remember. No makeup. Hair long, but still... I stole a look at the guy next to me, who was looking at me. I shrugged.

Later when she came again, I wondered if she'd correct herself, but she asked, "Would you like anything else, Ma'am?"

I don't think I've ever flown higher in my life.

I don't know the names of that clerk and flight attendant, but it's 19 years later and those two people stand out in my memory.

end of message
post a comment